Deklarasi Hari Hak-Hak Asasi Manusia dan Hak atas Kota

Kami, organisasi-organisasi gerakan sosial, masyarakat sipil dan pemerintahan lokal berkomitmen atas keadilan sosial melalui promosi, perlindungan, dan pemenuhan seluruh hak-hak asasi manusia yang terkait dengan habitat tempat hidup, termasuk Hak Asasi atas Perumahan yang Layak, Hak Tanah, dan Hak atas Kota di setiap wilayah di dunia.

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Human Rights, Terrorism and Counter-terrorism

The human cost of terrorism has been felt in virtually every corner of the globe. The United Nations family has itself suffered tragic human loss as a result of violent terrorist acts. The attack on its offices in Baghdad on 19 August 2003 claimed the lives of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Sergio Vieira de Mello, and 21 other men and women, and injured over 150 others, some very seriously.

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The Right to Health

As human beings, our health and the health of those we care about is a matter of daily concern. Regardless of our age, gender, socio-economic or ethnic background, we consider our health to be our most basic and essential asset. Ill health, on the other hand, can keep us from going to school or to work, from attending to our family responsibilities or from participating fully in the activities of our community. By the same token, we are willing to make many sacrifices if only that would guarantee us and our families a longer and healthier life. In short, when we talk about well-being, health is often what we have in mind.

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The International Convention on Migrant Workers

The International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families is the culmination of many years of discussions, reports and recommendations on the subject of migrants’ rights. The United Nations first voiced concern about the rights of migrant workers in 1972, when the Economic and Social Council, in its resolution 1706 (LIII), expressed alarm at the illegal transportation of labour to some European countries and at the exploitation of workers from some African countries “in conditions akin to slavery and forced labour.” In the same year, the General Assembly, in its resolution 2920 (XXVII), condemned discrimination against foreign workers and called upon Governments to end such practices and to improve reception arrangements for migrant workers.

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Civil and Political Rights

The Charter of the United Nations (1945) proclaims that one of the purposes of the United Nations is to promote and encourage respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms for all. This call was first given concrete expression with the promulgation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations General Assembly in 1948. Adopted against the background of the horrors of the Second World War, the Universal Declaration was the first attempt by all States to agree, in a single document, on a comprehensive catalogue of the rights of the human person. As its name suggests, it was not conceived of as a treaty but rather a proclamation of basic rights and fundamental freedoms, bearing the moral force of universal agreement. Its purpose has thus been described as setting “a common standard of achievement for all peoples in all nations”. Broadly speaking, the Universal Declaration sets down two broad categories of rights and freedoms – civil and political rights, on the one hand, and economic, social and cultural rights, on the other.

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Evaluating Human Rights Training Activities

The international community is increasingly promoting human rights education and training — through United Nations initiatives such as the World Programme for Human Rights Education (2005-ongoing) and the draft United Nations Declaration for human rights education and training — as a means to great ends: preventing human rights violations and violent conflicts, promoting equality and sustainable development, and enhancing people’s participation in decision-making within democratic systems. However, human rights education can contribute to these noble goals only if it is methodologically sound and fully relevant to the learners, so as to have a genuine empowering or sensitizing effect.

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Human Rights and Environmental Perspectives

This publication is the product of a partnership between the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and Heinrich Böll Foundation (hbs). The publication draws from and expands upon OHCHR’s Baseline Study on the Human Rights Risks and Implications of Mega-Infrastructure Investment (2017). This publication was informed by expert meetings in Berlin (March 2017), Washington DC (April 2017) and New York (April 2018) (see further below).

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World Programme for Human Rights Education

The first step to solving many of the world’s crises and chronic problems lies in more, and better, human rights education. From climate change to poverty, conflict, discrimination, disease and beyond, our progress must be grounded in the knowledge that we all belong to one human family and that we share important principles, values and rights. Human rights education that is participatory and learner-centred develops knowledge and important skills for critical analysis and action. It helps people to identify their rights and claim them effectively, and it assists officials and others who are responsible for protecting and fulfilling rights to understand how important it is to meet those obligations.

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Human Rights and the Post-2015 Development Agenda

WHO WILL BE ACCOUNTABLE?

As we approach the year 2015, from Tunis, to New York, to Santiago, a resounding call is being heard for a social, political and economic order that delivers on the promises of “freedom from fear and want.” Civil society everywhere is calling for meaningful participation, higher levels of accountability from Governments and international institutions, an end to discrimination and exclusion, a better distribution of economic and political power, and the protection of human rights under the rule of law. “The peoples of the United Nations” are speaking, often at great personal risk, and the degree to which their legitimate concerns are heard and reflected in the post-2015 agenda will determine both the legitimacy and the success of that agenda.

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